LCDBF – We did it!

Well we did it! We raised over $7100 for the Lake Champlain Dragon Boat Festival. We finished in 3rd place for fundraising! We also snagged second place for best name at the event. Last night, I had the opportunity to receive an award on behalf of my team for fundraising.

The festival was truly a powerful event that left me feeling a rush of adrenaline afterwards. I was also asked to speak at the event and share my personal stIMG_7308ory with cancer, along with the success of fundraising. We were featured in local medias including WCAX Channel 3 News, WPTZ Channel 5 News and Burlington Free Press (click the links to see the story). I felt so honored to be asked to speak on behalf of the LCDBF at the time.

Being on the water that day surrounded by family and friends willing to support me was a blessing and amazing feeling. The rush of energy that comes from an event like this continues on days and months past it. I am really looking forward to being able to organize and participate again next year. Keep a look out for Soaring On, were doing great things!

 

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Support from Family, Friends, Colleagues and the Community

My Dragon Boat Team to date has fundraised $4918 towards the Lake Champlain Dragon Boat Festival. This means the world to me! Not only are my friends and family making donations but twenty of them are paddling and collecting donations themselves. Each paddler paid a $35 entry fee, bought a Soaring On t-shirt for $15 and promised to fundraise a minimum of $50. So many of them have surpassed that.

One of the things that has really touched me over the last couple months and continues to touch me is how my family and friends have shared my story in their own perspectives. This means so much to me and really touches my heart every time I read one.

I will be paddling with my friend and college teammate, Gabrielle, who was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2016 at the age of 29 with a 5 week old daughter. Fortunately, early diagnosis and treatment were successful and Gabby’s one year scans have come back cancer free! However, the journey was not and is not easy, and Gabby is still benefiting from organizations providing ongoing support to cancer survivors.

Gabby and Aaron became friends while at St. Michael’s College.  Gabby was diagnosed with cancer at the time of the birth of her daughter about a year and a half ago.  They are doing great!  Many of us have been deeply affected in our families by cancer. I hope you may be able to help with any donation at all in their honor as well.

For me and my family this is an important cause, because we are extremely grateful for the support Gabrielle received this year after being diagnosed with cancer. 100% of the money stays in Vermont to support cancer survivors like Gabrielle.

I have had the honor of being asked to paddle on a Dragon Boat Team. I am paddling on a team called “Soaring On”. This team was put together by a client of mine who is a very young Ovarian Cancer Survivor. This is very dear to my heart as not only is she a great client but AMAZING person, wife and a mother of a 1 year old.

It makes me realize how much my life touches others around me. My family and friends have been a great support to me. There are also so many of you who have donated to my cause as well. You have no idea how much this really means to me. To me it feels great to be giving back to organizations that helped me recover from a cancer diagnosis and continue to help me.

Thank you to my teammates for all of your hard work in making this possible. Thank you to everyone who has helped us reach to reach our fundraising goals. I am looking foward to race day in a couple of weeks.

If you’re interested in donating to support our Dragon Boat Team, donations can be made via this link: Gabrielle’s Dragon Boat Festival Fundraising Page.

Thank you!

Love,

Gabrielle

When Your Told That You Have Cancer…

I follow Today Parent on Facebook and an article came through my news feed last night that I felt like I had to read. It was titled,  “What Happens When Someone Tells You That You Have Cancer“. My story isn’t that different than the one in that article. It’s not something that I will forget. I was a Mom and that was coming first. I couldn’t just go home and cry my eyes out and curl in a ball. I had to go home and take care of newborn child. I even had my daughter with me when I found out the news. My husband, daughter and I went home following the news from the doctor. She still needed to eat, her diaper changed and rocked.

Then I called my Mom and I told her that she needed to come over right away. I didn’t tell her over the phone but I imagine a lot was racing through her head, but I am sure “cancer” wasn’t something that she was thinking of. We told her what the doctor said and asked her to share the news with my Dad and Brother. I couldn’t bare sharing that news in person with them. It was hard enough having to tell my Mom something like this. I just kept picturing my daughter telling me that same news and how devastated I would’ve been. My Mom she was amazing though she held it together, she was my Mom and did everything I needed her to do as my Mom. We then made the trip to my in-laws to tell them the news. We stood in their kitchen, I was holding my daughter in my arms. I began by saying remember when the doctors were talking about the cyst they found during the c-section, well it came back as cancer. Sharing news like is never easy I will never forget those moments of watching you turn someones life upside down. I wish I was done having to tell people at that moment about the diagnosis but then you realize how many people are part of your life. There were still friends and colleagues that I needed to tell.

We went back home and this time I just slept and I slept. My husband took care of our daughter and I just slept. By sleeping I could dream of amazing things. I wasn’t having to deal with the reality that I had cancer and that I didn’t know how bad it could possibly be. Being awake was horrible to me, sleeping was what made everything better. However, I still needed to get up for night feedings for my daughter.

Thankfully the next morning at 8am my doctor gave me reassuring news that they had good margins from when my doctor removed the cyst from my ovary during the c-section. That night I had my scans done and by the following morning I knew that there was no cancer in me. I am thankful for my amazing doctors who worked on their day off and constantly reassured  me everything was okay. I was fortunate enough that I only had to live two days thinking cancer was in me. I am thankful for the quick turnaround the hospital did in getting my insurance approved and my scans processed the same day. I know not everyone is so fortunate but I am very thankful for all the hard work that everyone put in for me that day. I know it goes beyond the doctors, I know it goes to the schedulers, the admin clerks, the processors, the technicians, the insurance claimers, who all worked very hard in a short period of time for me and my family. I am extremely thankful to all of you!

 

 

Woohoo! Another 5K done!

Just finished another 5K in Essex this past weekend. Money raised helped support a local basketball team. I didn’t train nearly enough but I still managed to do well. I completed the 5IMG_4516K in 30:38. Not too bad considering the sizes of the hills and that the entire course was all hills. The weather was also horrible it rained right up until the last minute. It made the air muggy and the air felt heavy. I got a real good sweat out of this one. I had a great cheering group and also ran with some of my colleagues. It felt awesome to get out and run again.

I always feel great after a run. I love that my family comes and cheers me on no matter how big or how small the raIMG_4514ce is. I love coming in faster than people expect me to. Nothing is better than waking up sore the next day.

I am hoping to find another 5K race to compete in again soon. I guess I better start looking for more. Until then I will just keep on running  one day at time. Enjoying a new passion of mine!

 

 

Paddling on Lake Champlain

Last night my Young Cancer Survivor group had the opportunity to go out onto Lake Champlain and paddle with Dragonheart Vermont. We went out on Lake Champlain for an hour just paddling around. This is a group of individuals who range in age from 18-40 who are all cancer survivors. Some have even beaten cancer twice! Some were diagnosed and survived years ago and then there are others who are newer like myself. It was a great opportunity to meet other survivors, as Dragonheart is made up of breast cancer survivors.

I am extremely happy to fundraising to help support Dragonheart’s mission. “The members of Dragonheart Vermont strive to promote breast cancer awareness in our community, to rovide hope to other cancer survivors and their families to live each moment fully, and to support our own team members in a spirit of camaraderie and joy, (dragonheartvermont.org, 2017). Although I am not a breast cancer survivor I was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, Dragonheart supports all local cancer survivors. Many of the programs I’ve utilized in my recovery were sponsored by the money raised by Dragonheart.

I am organizing a dragon boat team to paddle in the Lake Champlain Dragon Boat Festival. By clicking this link it will bring you to my fundraising page. The Lake Champlain Dragon Boat Festival supports cancer survivors just like myself. It is a great organization and a great cause.

I’ve met some amazing people through the Young Cancer Survivor group. We’re all different and we all need support in our different ways. It felt amazing to be out on the water last night. I am looking forward to being able to do it again soon!

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Vermont Young Cancer Survivor Group Paddling on Lake Champlain with Dragonheart Vermont

 

 

 

 

 

Vermont City Marathon Relay Team!

I did it! I finished the race. I crushed my training time and managed to run all 3.4 miles. It was the most amazing experience.

As I started to cross the start line of the race. The music was blaring and the crowds were cheering. I could here the announcer in the background. As I started on with the race my emotions started to get the best of me. It was the feeling of accomplishment. It was only sixteen months ago that I had been diagnosed with ovarian cancer. I had beaten cancer, I had raised my daughter and now I was running on a relay team in the Vermont City Marathon. I had accomplished so much. It felt like I had closed a chapter in my life. As I continued running I realized that I need to focus, so I took one deep breathe let it out and started putting one foot in front of the other.

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Holly & Gabrielle (before the race)

I took the corner onto Pearl Street and the crowds were still cheering. My friend Holly told me to get moving, and well that’s when it all started to sync in. I was watching the crowds, reading the signs along the way. My speed started to increase. I made it to South Willard Street, I took that corner and my speed continued to move. I was suddenly passing other runners on the course. I was improving my performance as I went up hill. I finally reached the top and made my way down Beech Street. Up next was South Union. At that point the crowds were dying down and I was already past the two mile checkpoint. I plugged in my headphones and let the music blare. I saw two kids on my right with the hands out looking for high-fives. I made my way over to them, there faces lit up as I put out my hand for them. Then I suddenly at the corner of Main Street. I know my husband and daughter were not that much far away. I couldn’t wait to see them in the crowds. I picked up my pace once again. However, I completely forgot that Church Street is up hill. Thank goodness my cheering crowd was at the top of the hill. Seeing them was the motivation I needed to keep my feet moving. I saw them in the distance. I yelled to them and they waved back and cheered. Once I passed them I knew I wasn’t too far from the finish line. I kept running I knew the exchange point for the relay wasn’t too far away. I made my last corner and was coming down Park Street. I could hear someone yelling my name and the next thing I know I see my relay teammate jumping up and down. I hand him the bracelet cheer him on and realize I am done. I had finished the race!

There was nothing more amazing than having my seventeen month old daughter watching me run in a race. I was showing her that we can do whatever we put our minds to. We can be strong and powerful when we want to be. Running has been great for me. It has given me so much. It always amazes me how much we can all accomplish if we just have the confidence to do it.

 

Three More Days!

Only 3 days until the Vermont City Marathon. I am running the first leg of the race which is about 3.5 miles. My training started back in February. I was doing really well up until 2 1/2 weeks ago when my daughter got sick and I couldn’t run. I am bummed because I was doing really well with my times and my body was prepared for it. I ran Monday night 2.11 miles and my time was better than I thought but it was still slow. I managed to get a run in at lunch. It was super hilly and it was a good run rough estimate of 1.8 miles. I have a long walk planned on Friday if the weather lets me. Saturday will be my rest day and Sunday is RACE DAY!

All the training I have done has been outdoors. I don’t have a treadmill and I don’t have a gym pass. I was going to do this with spending the least amount of money possible. I have purchased a new simg_3616.jpgports bra, new running shoes, new sock and some music for my phone. I’ve run with our dog, our daughter in the jogging stroller, with music and without. I run when I can. I run after work, or on a lunch break or after 8 pm when our daughter has gone to bed. My husband has been amazing with the support but encouraging me and making sure I have time to get out there and run.

I am nervous heading into Sunday. I have never run in a race before and I’ve never watched the marathon. I have no idea what to expect. I am looking forward to the race and I am really looking forward to being done with it too.

I am really happy that my husband and daughter will be there to support me on race day. This means a lot. Especially since the race starts at 7 am and I am running in the first leg. I know accomplishing something like this will be huge to me. This is beyond anything I ever thought I would be doing so I can’t wait to cross that finish line!

Be Kind. Always.

As we approach Mother’s Day this weekend I am reminded of two very important things. One that I am very thankful to have my Daughter and two how thankful I am here today with her.

I am also reminded that not everyone is as lucky as I am. It reminds me of any earlier post I made and the quote I shared. We are all fighting battles and we all need support from one another. It doesn’t matter how big or how small your battle might seem. It’s a battle that we are all facing. So remember to be kind, smile, say please and thank you. Tell a friend you’re thinking of them, send a card and send some love. We are all fighting different battles through our lives and its really important to be there for people along the way. Image result for you don't know battle someone is fighting

We all have a lot to be thankful in our lives. Cherish the moments you get to spend with your love ones. Remember that there are family and friends out there that might not be so lucky.

To anyone out there know that you’re not alone we all fighting different battles. They might be different battles, but they are all important no matter how big or small they might be.

To all my friends and family out there know I am always thinking of all of you. You’ve been there for me so much and I will continue to be there for all of you.  Capture

Stowe Weekend of Hope – Young Cancer Survivors

Friday, May 5th, 2017

Hi Everyone! My name is Gabrielle and I am 30 years old. I am a Wife, Mom, Daughter, Sister, Aunt, Ice Hockey Player, Runner, Career Woman, and an Ovarian Cancer Survivor. I am here today to share my “cancer” story, how my life changed and how I overcame many obstacles along this journey.

On December 11th, 2015 my life changed and it was one of the best days of my life. On that day my daughter was born. It was the happiest day for my husband and I. What we didn’t know at the time, was that on that day a miracle happened to us in more ways than one.

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Pictured: Kathy McBeth – Board of Directors Stowe Weekend of Hope, and Gabrielle

Our daughter was born via emergency C-section after having complications during delivery. During the C-section a cyst was found on my ovary. It wasn’t until six weeks later that we got that dreadful call from the doctor asking for us to come in. To be honest I had completely forgotten about it, the doctors said it didn’t look like cancer and at the time and we were so caught up with our newborn daughter. So on January 21st we got the news that the cyst was cancer and that it was diagnosed as Ovarian Angiosarcoma. They told us that it was very rare and aggressive cancer and that they had an appointment for me the following morning at the University of Vermont Medical Center.

A lot goes through your mind when you hear something like that. I was a new mom holding a six week old baby in my arms. I had just gone from the highest moment in my life to one of the worst. My life had completely turned upside down and it wasn’t about me anymore it was all about her. My head began racing I was envisioning her crawling, walking, to her saying “Momma”, to her prom and wedding day.

The emotions weren’t going away, what came next was one of the hardest things I had to do. I had to share the news with my parents and family. It wasn’t just about the diagnosis, we suddenly needed help;we had a 6 week old baby at home. Asking for help doesn’t come naturally for me. So began to me the dreadful process of asking for help and telling the people who are really important to me that our lives were about to change. I say “our” because this diagnosis wasn’t just about me it was about the people that surround me,their lives were changing too.

When my brother found out about my diagnosis he said the best thing to me and that was there was “hope.” I had never thought about life that way that way and he was right. The word “hope” means so much. We get a diagnosis like this and the first thing that comes to your mind is what if I don’t beat this. However, life was giving me the opportunity.

We don’t like talking about dying. When I was younger I always thought if I was going to die, that I would want it to be quick. When you become a Mom that changes, you want more than anything to be there for your child.

Once again after two days of doctor’s appointments and scans my emotions were at another level, I got the best news! There were no signs of cancer from the scans. My doctor still felt that it was necessary to remove one of my ovaries. Three weeks later I went in for surgery, I was in and out in one day. My family and friends all showed up and helped. They rallied behind us and pitched in from cleaning our house, doing our laundry, delivering food and taking care of our daughter. The most challenging thing emotionally at the time for me was that I couldn’t hold my daughter for about a week. It was difficult for her and it was difficult for me. Now I realize that it was minimal. At the time it felt like the hardest thing emotionally. She wanted her Mommy and I couldn’t be there.

I cherish and enjoy every minute I spend with her, being a Mom has been the greatest gift of all. One day I will share my story with her and everything we went through as a family. I will share with her how she saved my life, how being her Mom is the greatest thing I could ever imagine.

After the surgery everyone’s life went back to normal, except for me or at least that’s what it seemed like to me. We didn’t need the help, and I was cancer free. However, as the patient there is one last step that you personally have to deal with and that is the emotional part of it. I had to accept that yes I was now part of a group that nobody wants to be part of.

I went back to work after a 15 week maternity leave. To my co-workers they just thought I was on maternity leave, only a few people at work knew what had happened. On my first day of work I needed to share what had happened to me. I sat in the conference room in front of all my co-workers and explained them that what my family and I had been going through for the past month. The problem was at the time I didn’t want to talk about what I went through and I made it clear to my colleagues, family and friends. On the outside my life went right back to normal but inside it didn’t feel that way. My family and friends couldn’t relate to the feelings I felt. I had gone through a roller coaster in a matter of one month.

The reality is that I really needed to talk out loud about my diagnosis and what I went through in order to recover from it. Cancer doesn’t just affect us physically it hits us emotionally too. I struggled with how to do this, I needed my family and friends to understand how I was feeling without having an awkward conversations.

So I began writing a blog. I began writing every time I was frustrated and overwhelmed and when I was finally comfortable I shared it will all my friends and family. As Winnie the Pooh said “You can’t stay in your corner of the Forest waiting for others to come to you. You have to go to them sometimes.

I use the blog to share how I am feeling and what I am going through. This blog is my outlet,when I write I feel like a weight has been lifted off my chest. One of the hardest challenges I find is that by looking at me you wouldn’t know that a year and half ago I was diagnosed with cancer.

Right before Christmas this year I went out to dinner for a work event and was hit with a challenge. I wrote about it in my blog, which went on onto say:

“Tonight I went out to dinner. The person next to me just met for the very first time. This person doesn’t know me and would have no reason to know my “cancer” story. As I sat there he began talking about how he had just attended a fundraising event to help children with cancer. He went to say how we can never imagine what these people went through. In my head I just wanted to yell out “I DO KNOW!” My heart starts racing and I realizing I am holding my breath because I feel like everyone at my table is watching me. A lot is going through my head, “I do know what you’re talking about!” “That was me only eleven months ago, can we please change the subject?” I am dealing with it now as I approach my one year diagnosis date and one month later my scans.

I know I won’t bring up my story so I stay silent and just continue nodding my head. I don’t want to ruin the mood with my story. I don’t want to make that person feel guilty or uncomfortable. So I will continue to sit there and just nod my head. I will pretend like I am like everyone else at the table just living our normal lives; hiding my cancer scars behind my shirt. Tonight the invisibility is a curse, it will continue to bother me and bring up memories for me. I will be the one that will see this feeling awkward and uncomfortable.

This diagnosis changed my life forever and I hate it for that. My life will never be the way it was before. I have to continue to live my life with (this) diagnosis. Every so often there will be days like this one where it gets turned upside down.”

I shared what I went through because I was frustrated at the time, and to me I didn’t think any of my family and friends would understand what I was going through. By writing this and sharing it with them they had the opportunity to know how I was feeling and how to be there for me.

It was around this time that I began to also deal with the fact that I was coming up on my scans. I was about a few months away from my first set.

One of the hardest challenges I faced was waiting.  My doctors recommend waiting a year before doing my first set of scan post-surgery. A year is a long time to wait for something like this. As the date approached and by approaching I mean months away I began to feel the stress and anxiousness associated with it. It’s been referred to me as “scanitice”.

During that year I felt like my life was on hold until those scans happened. I had fears of what might happen to me, what will they show, did we miss something? I felt like I didn’t want to plan anything for the future, I didn’t want to leave a burden on my husband if something went wrong. I didn’t want to think about having more children because what if they told me I couldn’t have more children. I began writing those feelings and sharing them out loud. I found by writing that my friends and family could relate to me and could easily have conversations about what I was going through. I didn’t feel so alone through this process.

Even being diagnosed with cancer I still find it difficult to relate to others who have been diagnosed. We all fight battles differently and we all need support in different ways.

I am thankful my results came back great, there were no signs of cancer and I was told that I could have more children in my future.

I have continued on with my blog since my all clear in February, it will sometimes be about my diagnosis as that will never go away. My blog does have a new shift to it as it’s focusing on some amazing things I am doing. I’ve started new chapters in my life that I never imagined I would be doing, I have begun training for a relay team in Vermont City Marathon, organizing my Dragon Boat team “Soaring On” and including me speaking tonight to all of you.

I know I am not alone in this journey I have an amazing support team as many of you are here today, including biggest supporter and love of my life, my Husband.  I have a great group of family of friends that I am thankful to have part of my life. My journey will continue and I am only at the beginning of this thing called life.

 

When my feet hit the pavement

I never imagined in a million years that I would be so into running. Last night I went out for my first solo run. Neely was exhausted from an earlier play date and my daughter was already asleep. I changed into my running clothes, pulled my hair back, laced up my running shoes and put the headphones in. I stepped outside into the warm air, the music began blaring and my feet started to move along the pavement. As I hit the second turn in my run I realize that my speed is much fast than I had thought. I was planning on running two miles tonight, as I had ran one and half the night before with Neely. I look down at my watch and realize my pace. In my head I am thinking; “this can’t be right!” I am not winded, I don’t have blisters, my shins don’t burn, and I am actually picking up my pace. The music continues to fill my head. I am approaching the one mile mark and realize that I am running my first mile in eight minutes.”That can’t be right?” “When was the last time I ever did that!” As I continue on I start to feel the affects of my eight minute mile, my pace begins to slow down but it isn’t until the last quarter mile. I look down and I am still doing good time. I push myself. “I don’t need to run tomorrow so I can do this!” I hit the entrance to my driveway and I stop my running and begin to walk off the exhaustion. I look down at my watch. I finished my run in nineteen minutes. Not too bad for someone who only started running two and half months ago. I’ve never been so impressed with myself in regards to physical activity. I had no idea how great of shape I’ve gotten myself into. I look forward to my next run in a couple days!